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Frankenstein and Araby Essay

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The delineation of female characters in “Frankenstein” and “Araby” is in a very passive manner. Both Mary Shelley and James Joyce urges the readers to ponder upon the then existing social status of women. The women in these works of fiction are treated as material goods and have minimal privileges with respect to the male character. In Frankenstein, Elizabeth Lavenza is depicted as an object with minimal rights and privileges. She is portrayed as a possession for Victor Frankenstein to protect. In the same manner, Araby explicates the character of Mangan’s sister as a submissive sex. Araby is a narrative about a boy who embarks in a quest to achieve success in his love. Both these stories have the female characters in pivotal roles, but fail to depict them in a humanized form. There is strong evidence within the texts, suggesting the “othering” of at least one female character in comparison with the male characters.
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley portrays the entire lifetime of a Genevese person named Victor Frankenstein. The story introduces mainly three female characters, Caroline Beaufort, Elizabeth Lavenza and Justine Moritz. As far as the plot is considered, Elizabeth Lavenza plays a pivotal role in the lifespan of Victor Frankenstein, the main protagonist. She is Frankenstein’s fiancé and is depicted as a possession for Frankenstein to protect. She does not have many rights and say in the novel and the only purpose of her character is to reflect the male protagonist. Her physical and mental attributes are opposite to that of Frankenstein but still, “there was a harmony in that very dissimilitude” (Shelley, 66). Frankenstein considered himself more intellectually capable than Elizabeth Lavenza. He is depicted as a calm and phi...


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...rtunes, Shelley was successful in evoking questions within the readers which helped to bring down the then existing patriarchal society. On the other hand, James Joyce, by “othering” Mangan’s sister was able to communicate the dream of Irish people for home rule. The metaphorical representation of Mangan’s sister as Middle East and the bazaar named Araby all illustrates the Irish people’s want to escape from the colonization to world with romance, enchantment, and freedom.











Works Cited.
Joyce, James." Araby". Theory into Practice. Ed. Ann B. Dobie. Toronto: Nelson Thomson, 2002.230-233. Print.
Moore, Lorrie. “You’re ugly too”. The Broadview Anthology of Short Fiction. Ed. Julia Gaunce and Suzette Mayr. Peterborough, Ontario: Broadview Press Ltd., 2004. 275- 276. Print.
Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. Peterborough: Broadview Press Ltd., 1999.Print.


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Frankenstein and Araby Essay - The delineation of female characters in “Frankenstein” and “Araby” is in a very passive manner. Both Mary Shelley and James Joyce urges the readers to ponder upon the then existing social status of women. The women in these works of fiction are treated as material goods and have minimal privileges with respect to the male character. In Frankenstein, Elizabeth Lavenza is depicted as an object with minimal rights and privileges. She is drawn out as possession for Victor Frankenstein to protect. In the same manner, Araby explicates the character of Mangan’s sister as a submissive sex....   [tags: Character Analysis. Comparisons] 876 words
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