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Forensic Psychology Essay

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The spouse of a military officer shot and murdered her son on the way to his soccer practice, then drove to the families chic home and shot her daughter in the head while she studied at her computer. After, police discovered the mother's motive, her children were being “mouthy” with her all the time. When stories, such as this one, pop up in the media about murders and homicides, does one wonder if the brain plays a major role in individuals’ killings? Or just how the brain works in general? How does the brain tie in with criminal law? In today’s society forensic science provides vital information to the court system, and it helps provide precise data in order to help imprison the convict. In forensic psychology this is where the brain and the legal system take place and combine. In criminal law today forensic psychology is sky rocketing. The amount of educational and training methods that are suddenly being created is phenomenal. By providing this evidence to the courts system this will make it highly possible for an individual to be become incarcerated. In this paper the discussion will portray towards forensic psychology and criminal law and how they tie in together, the purpose of forensic psychology and educational ideas that are needed for the field.
What is forensic psychology? Forensic psychology involves the interaction of psychology and the legal process (Bringham, 1999). Forensic psychology is the professional practice by psychologists who foresee ably and regularly provide professional psychological expertise to the judicial system (Kane, 2007). A more broad definition of forensic psychology would include not only clinicians but also other psychologist (social development, cognitive, experimental, etc.) who may co...


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...(1), 72-77.
Otto, R. K, & Heilbrun, K. (2002). The practice of forensic psychology: a look toward the future in light of the past. American Psychological Association, 57(1), 5-18.
Palmer, E. (2005). How does forensic psychology benefit from other branches of psychology?. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 19(5), 676-678.
Ramsland, K. (2009). The facts about fiction: what grissom could learn about forensic psychology. Journal of Psychiatry & Law, 37(1), 37-50.
Shams, M. T. (2010). Forensic psychology . The Brown University Child and Adolescent Behavior Letter, 26(5), 5-7.
Snook, B., Doan, B., & Cullen, R. (2008). Publication and research trends in police psychology: a review of five forensic psychology journals. Springer Science & Business Media, 24(1), 45-50.
Ward, T. (2008). Human rights and forensic psychology. Legal and Criminological Psychology, 53(2), 209-218.


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