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Exploring St. Augustine of Hippo's Augustine Confessions Essay

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Augustine’s Confessions is an autobiographical work by St. Augustine of Hippo, written in Latin between 397 and 398 CE. Saint Augustine is one of the most important figures in Western Christianity because of his teachings and interpretations of the gospel. He is also considered one the church fathers of Latin Christianity. This inspiring autobiography explores St. Augustine sinful childhood and adolescence, further conversion to Christianity and teachings as bishop of Hippo.

This autobiography is divided into thirteen books, from which the first nine are mostly autobiographical, and the last four mostly are commentaries, where he discusses philosophical and theological issues. In the first book, St. Augustine praises God and clearly expresses sorrow because of his many sins. He shows an interest in God and Latin. The second book, focus on his sixteenth year. He explores the wickedness of his youth by remembering how delighted he felt when he stole some pears from a neighborhood orchard with his friends. Later on in this book, he explains the remission of his sins and learns what it means to find rest in God. The third book explores his days as a student in Carthage, his delight in Cicero’s Hortensius book and love for philosophy, and his disapproval of Manichaeans doctrines. The fourth book has the story of his years among the Manichaeans, his attraction to astrology and the introduction to other philosophy books. The fifth book centers on his encounter with Faustus. Augustine realizes that Faustus couldn’t answer his questions, and therefore the Manichaeans doctrine left him unsatisfied. After his meeting with Faustus, Augustine flees to Rome where he meets Ambrose and later decides to become a Christian catechumen. The sixth...


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... Original Sin all men are sinners and therefore nobody is worthy of entering the Kingdom of God. In order for man to respond to the will of God, it is necessary to receive a divine, mysterious help called Grace. In Christian theology grace is defined as love and mercy given by God, not because we have earn it, because he wants us to have it. Grace helps human beings in becoming sanctified, and provides strength to resist temptation and endure trials. Grace is God’s gift of salvation for sinners. Without this divine help humanity will never return to heaven and live with God.

The doctrines of the Original Sin and grace were formulated by Saint Augustine after a long time of searching answer to his questions. It was interesting to see the origin and formulation of these doctrines, and the invaluable influence they had during the early days of Christianity.


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