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Exploring My Mental Illnesses Essay

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In today’s society it’s very difficult for people to successfully identify who they are, where they belong in this world, as well as establish and maintain healthy relationships with those around them. These issues can considerably be much more problematic for someone with a mental illness. Furthermore, these challenges can be even worse for an individual who has a mental illness but hasn’t been officially diagnosed with an overall condition; therefore, making it all the more difficult for that person to receive the proper help and assistance needed to live a happy and successful life. I just so happen to be one of those individuals who has never been formally diagnosed with a mental disability. Other than being noted for suffering from excessive anxiety and depression as a teenager, I have no actual idea what mental condition I may have. So, in an effort of gaining a greater understanding of myself, I’d like to explore several mental illnesses that describe some of my symptoms in order to see which aspects of these disorders match my life experiences.

The first disorder to which I believe closely pertains to me is Borderline personality disorder. According to Pamela Bjorklund, this serious disorder is most accurately described as a consistent pattern of instability and impulsive behavior within the contexts of relationships and self-image, among many others (5). It is believed to be caused by childhood traumas such as parental neglect or sexual, physical, or emotional abuse (Bjorkland 5). Borderline personality disorder could also be caused by exposure to harmful environments such as war and disease (Bjorklund 5 & Holm el at. 560). However, as Bjorklund states according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Diso...


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...earch Complete. Web. 24 Apr. 2014.
Levy, Kenneth N. "Subtypes, Dimensions, Levels, and Mental States in Narcissism and Narcissistic Personality Disorder." Journal of Clinical Psychology 68.8 (2012): 886-897. Academic Search Complete. Web. 29 Apr. 2014.
Pincus, Aaron L., Nicole M. Cain, and Aidan G. C. Wright. "Narcissistic Grandiosity and Narcissistic Vulnerability in Psychotherapy." Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment (2014): PsycARTICLES. Web. 29 Apr. 2014.
Zbozinek, Tomislav D.Rose, Raphael D.Wolitzky-Taylor, Kate B.Sherbourne, CathySullivan, GreerStein, Murray B.Roy-Byrne, Peter P.Craske, Michelle G. "Diagnostic Overlap of Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder in a Primary Care Sample." Depression & Anxiety (1091-4269) 29.12 (2012): 1065-1071. Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection. Web. 29 Apr. 2014.



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