Preview
Preview

European Imperialism in Africa Essay

No Works Cited
Length: 1417 words (4 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Blue      
Open Document




- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Europe, in the late 1800’s, was starting for a land grab in the African continent. Around 1878, most of Africa was unexplored, but by 1914, most of Africa, with the lucky exception of Liberia and Ethiopia, was carved up between European powers. There were countless motivations that spurred the European powers to carve Africa, like economical, political, and socio–cultural, and there were countless attitudes towards this expansion into Africa, some of approval and some of condemnation.

Europe in this period was a world of competing countries. Britain had a global empire to lead, France had competition with Britain for wealth and so did other nations like Germany and Russia. Expansion was a goal that all nations wanted to achieve. Prince Leopold, the heir of the Belgian Throne, in a conversation, explained that “since history teaches us that colonies are useful… let us strive to get on in our turn… to lead to progress in every sense.” Being a prince, Leopold must have had a pro imperialist point of view, because he wanted to keep Belgium strong and prosperous. Cecil Rhodes, in a speech at the chartering of the British South Africa company, said “Philanthropy is good, but philanthropy at 5 percent is even better.” Cecil Rhodes’s quote clearly illustrates a materialistic point of view, owing to the fact that he was the founder of De Beers Diamond Company. Being a businessman, a desire of profit was natural. However, there are other examples that show a condemnation of imperialism for economical reasons. According to William Clark, in The Genesis of Jingoism, “capitalism is international… and it will prove in the long run to be one of the leading factors in breaking down of nationalism.” Owing to the fact that this excerpt from “The...


... middle of paper ...


...er the coat, communicated with a band of ribbon which Passover the palm of the white brother’s hand, and when he gave the black brother a cordial grasp of the hand, the black brother was surprised to find his white brother so strong that he nearly knocked him off his feet. By such means as these and a few boxes of gin, whole villages had been signed away to your majesty.” This account explains the exploitation the Europeans used to get their lands. Williams’ point of view seems biased against imperialism. This may be because of the clerical background. He probably wrote the letter to show the king the atrocities that were being committed against the Africans. This cultural spread ultimately led to revolts against the Europeans. Many African ethnicities changed their culture to match their European contemporaries and, using the technology had revolutions of their own.


Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »







This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
European Imperialism in Africa Essay - Europe, in the late 1800’s, was starting for a land grab in the African continent. Around 1878, most of Africa was unexplored, but by 1914, most of Africa, with the lucky exception of Liberia and Ethiopia, was carved up between European powers. There were countless motivations that spurred the European powers to carve Africa, like economical, political, and socio–cultural, and there were countless attitudes towards this expansion into Africa, some of approval and some of condemnation. Europe in this period was a world of competing countries....   [tags: Imperialism ] 1417 words
(4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay on European Imperialism in Africa - Imperialism By the late 19th and early 20th century, Europe was expanding its borders. In an attempt to grow its economy and culture, Europe’s superpowers began to search for new soil. Africa was an easy target; it wasn’t politically secure and it wasn’t modernized. In addition, it had reliable soil which would enable Europe to produce cash crops. European nations began to pour into Africa, called the Scramble for Africa. Soon, Europe took control of Africa, taking raw materials and destroyed African culture....   [tags: Imperialism] 1456 words
(4.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
European Imperialism in Africa Essay - In the early 1880’s, the powers of Europe started to take control of regions in Africa and set up colonies there. In the beginning, colonization caused the Africans little harm, but before long, the Europeans started to take complete control of wherever they went. The Europeans used their advanced knowledge and technology to easily maneuver through the vast African landscape and used advanced weapons to take control of the African people and their land. The countries that claimed the most land and had the most significant effect on Africa were France, England, Belgium, and Germany....   [tags: colonialism, african history, european history] 1534 words
(4.4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The Effects of European Imperialism on Africa Essay - By the year 1924, approximately one-quarter of the world’s total land area and population was under the control of the British Empire. This was the time at which it was at its peak -- however, the British were faced with an abundance of competition during this time. Preceded very closely by the Industrial Revolution of the 18th and 19th centuries, this sudden hunger for expansion was felt by many “famished” countries in Europe -- and elsewhere around the world -- that wished to acquire new territories and, in so doing, gain status and boost their economies....   [tags: British Europe, Africa, Germany] 933 words
(2.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Migration and Disease in Africa during European Imperialism Essay - The Relationship between Migration and Disease in Africa during European Imperialism During the era of European Imperialism, from approximately 1880 to 1930, an increasing number of Europeans began to colonize West Africa. Because of this colonization many African natives migrated eastward, inadvertently transporting diseases to which the East Africans were not immune (Ransford 76). This phenomenon can be explained through examining the implications of geographical isolation, the effects of large-scale migration, and alluding to a specific example of disease transference in Africa from the west to the east....   [tags: European History]
:: 4 Works Cited
736 words
(2.1 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
European Imperialism in Africa and Asia Essay - Introduction: The epoch of imperialism cannot be defined simply as proliferation of inflated egos tied to the hardened opinions of nationalists, but also a multi-faceted global rivalry with roots of philosophies tainted with racism and Social Darwinism. The technique of each imperialist was specific to the motivations and desires of each combative, predominantly Western power and subsequently impacted the success of each imperialist and its colonies. Driven by industrialization, Europeans were aware of the urgent need for raw materials and new markets to maintain a constant rate of expansion and wealth....   [tags: industrialization, search for raw materiaL] 1516 words
(4.3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay on Repercussions of European Imperialism in Africa - Repercussions of European Imperialism in Africa Between 1880 and 1910, Africa was divided up among the Europeans. For the next 50 years decisions affecting Africa and its people were made not in Africa, but in London, Paris, Lisbon and other European capitals. France acquired a huge empire in North and West Africa. Algeria, Tunisia, Morocco, Ivory Coast, Mali and other areas in West Africa came under French rule. Britain's colonies were scattered throughout the continent. Although the French controlled the most territory, Britain ruled the greatest number of people....   [tags: Papers] 338 words
(1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on Winds of Change: European Imperialism in Africa - ... This is clear in the document when Okonkwo was contradicted at a meeting by a man who had achieved no titles and Okonkwo stated “This meeting is for men.” (Achebe 26) Okonkwo had achieved two titles. Another part of everyday life in Umuofia was how women were treated as if they were property. The man was the head of the household and it was his wives’ jobs to serve him. The children of a husband and wife were property of the husband. Okonkwo made this clear by saying “I have even heard that in some tribes a man’s children belong to his wife” when talking about other villages’ customs....   [tags: umuofia, christians, soldiers, missionaries]
:: 1 Works Cited
1079 words
(3.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Effects of European Imperialism on South Africa Essay - The county of South Africa is an economically flourishing country and probably the most advanced country on the continent of Africa. However the entire continent of Africa is probably the most undeveloped part of the world. Why is South Africa so different from the rest of its continent. Karen Politis Virk explains that it is because of South Africa’s developed economy and diverse population (Virk 40). South Africa has three main ethnic groups: African, Afrikaners, and the mixed race. The Afrikaners and mixed races have many roots to Europe and Asia giving the nation even more diversity and a culture melting pot....   [tags: World Civilization ]
:: 11 Works Cited
1861 words
(5.3 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
The Impact of 19th Century European Imperialism in Africa Essay - European Imperialism heavily impacted the African continent through culturally, economic, and political ideas. This era of history is heavily drenched in the aspect of ethnocentrism, which is the belief that one’s own culture is superior that of another. The Europeans colonized Africa believing that they could bring civilization, but they were often ignorant of Africa’s very complex societies. The European powers divided up the continent of Africa among themselves, without any consent from the people who actually lived there....   [tags: Slave Trade, Administrative Outposts, Cash Crops] 1017 words
(2.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]