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The Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy on ADHD Essay

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ADHD clearly effects a child’s social environment, their friendships, and results in rejection that they experience. Intervening with social effects is, at times, difficult due to the fact that children with ADHD understand social expectations and can actually explain what is acceptable, however they are not able to behave within the social boundaries that they know exist (DuPaul & Weyandt, 2006). These children do not need to be taught what is acceptable, because they already understand what is acceptable; they are in need to learn how to behave within the social boundaries that are acceptable (DuPaul & Weyandt, 2006). Societal signs are usually indirect and due to the fact that children diagnosed with ADHD have a difficult time identifying things that are not obvious they have a tendency to miss societal signs (Ashley, 2005). Due to this fact, it is more challenging to treat these effects and according to DuPaul & Weyandt (2006) there are two explanations for this. One of the reasons is that present treatments focus on building social skills that are non-existent and not on displaying social skills (DuPaul & Weyandt, 2006). DuPaul & Weyandt (2006) state the second explanation is due to the fact that the inappropriate social behaviors take place in different environments, the child needs to be treated in different situations. However, participation in therapy in a group setting has not shown to produce significant improvements in social performances (DuPaul & Weyandt, 2006).
However, with all of these challenges known, Sheridan (1995) “developed the Tough Kids Social Skills program for use in school settings” (as cited in DuPaul & Weyandt, 2006, p. 170). Sheridan’s program was composed of different stages of social trea...


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...26(4), 221-233.
Walsh, J. (2010). Behavior theory. In J. Walsh (2nd), Theories for direct social work practice (123-146). Belmont, California: Wadsworth Cengage Learning.
Walsh, J. (2010). Cognitive theory. In J. Walsh (2nd), Theories for direct social work practice (147-176). Belmont, California: Wadsworth Cengage Learning.
Walsh, J. (2010). Narrative theory. In J. Walsh (2nd), Theories for direct social work practice (273-300). Belmont, California: Wadsworth Cengage Learning.
Young. S. & Amarasinghe, M. (2010). Practitioner review: Non-pharmacological treatments for ADHD: A lifespan approach. Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry, 51(2), 116-133. doi:10.1111/j.1469-7610.2009.02191.x
Zentall, S. S. (2005). Theory- and evidence-based strategies for children with attentional problems. Psychology in the Schools, 42(8), 821-836. doi: 10.1002/pits.20114


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