Preview
Preview

Essay Discourse in Dracula

No Works Cited
Length: 756 words (2.2 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Yellow      
Open Document




- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

No work of literature is ever written without consideration of the context of the time period of which it was constructed. Dracula, by Bram Stoker, and the film adaptation of the same text by Francis Coppola, differ greatly in attitudes, values and beliefs despite the fact that the film is based on the text. Furthermore, the added embellishments which no doubt make the film more pleasing to the viewer such as increased gore drown out the symbols of values and beliefs conveyed through the individual text. For this reason, the transition of medium and the change in context has highly warped the values and meaning imbued within Dracula.
It is clear from analysis of the original text that it is very much built within the framework of the patriarchal and repressed 19th century context. In Victorian England, expression of female sexuality was very much frowned upon and only two polar opposite states of sexuality existed – that of the pure, chaste virgin, and of the somewhat soiled wife and mother. When considering the main female characters, the first discrepancy between the movie and the book appears. In the book it is quite apparent throughout that Dracula is attempting to turn the chaste Lucy and Mina into their opposites – into Nosferatu, vampires and embodiments of the suppressed sexuality that in many ways defines the original text. However, in the movie Lucy is almost shockingly sexually aware, and is very forward with Quincey in particular before she is under the influence of Dracula. Blatant sexual imagery is shown in the movie where Lucy attempts to seduce Quincey, as evident in her appraisal of his dagger. As she moans in sultry tones, “Oh please let me touch it, it’s so big” referring to the phallic symbol of his dagger we ...


... middle of paper ...


...ucy’s personalities in the second excerpt scratches the surface of this particular value. What the movie certainly does not lack is discourse on class structure. Mina and Lucy several times mention ideas based on their class, which ties in with the discourse in the original text on social values and class. Mina and Dracula are the first vampires in the series, and both are members of the aristocracy. Perhaps this is a direct reference to an underlying view in both the director and Stoker’s mind that the aristocracy is in fact a parasitic entity that “drinks the living blood of others to grow strong”. The fact that religion is a vampire’s only weakness, a point echoed both in the book and the play in the “purification” of Lucy could also be an indication that one political point has not changed throughout the ages – religion is the only check upon the aristocracy.




Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »







This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
Bram Stoker's Dracula Essay - Victorian Women were highly held back in their full potential. Their main role in the household was to “be happy - a sunbeam in the house, making others happy” (Hardy, E.J. 1887). On top of this, Women in the Victorian era were not allowed to display their sexuality or “tempt” men in public; they were meant to be submissive and meek (Causey S., 2008). The Victorian era lasted from 1837 til 1901, with women being punished everyday for crimes that are nowadays just part of living for a woman. Bram Stoker was born during this era and wrote his most famous novel, Dracula (Miller, E....   [tags: WOmens Discourse, Vicctorian Era]
:: 4 Works Cited
566 words
(1.6 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Why I was Scared of Reading "Dracula" Essay - I was scared by the novel. I found the novel difficult to finish reading and I didn’t enjoy reading it. Usually I have no trouble reading books but with Dracula, my fear of the plot, the character and the topics in the novel prevented me from being able to read the book before I go to bed, which unfortunately is when I normally read. I think the fear I experienced when reading the book was mainly due to the circumstances under which I read it. In the time when people were first reading Dracula, vampires and other supernatural themes weren’t really something anyone had thought of writing about, so the readers were caught up in the idea that there could be vampires living in the same down as t...   [tags: Dracula, vampires, fear,] 1098 words
(3.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Derivation of Incest and Pedophilia as a Repressed Societal Fear in Dracula - The Derivation of Incest and Pedophilia as a Repressed Societal Fear in Dracula Franco Moretti provides a cogent argument for a particular understanding of societal fears existing in the Britain mind of the Victorian Era manifest in the gothic novel, Dracula. In his reading of Dracula, he chooses to extrapolate these fears along the lines of Marxist and psychoanalytic interpretative frameworks. Though Moretti admits that “it is hard to unite them harmoniously” (Moretti 104), he does not suppose these two frameworks to be mutually exclusive....   [tags: Dracula Essays] 1459 words
(4.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Dracula: A Simple Tale of Good vs. Evil Essay - Batman beats the Joker. Spiderman banishes the Green Goblin. For centuries story tellers have used the basic idea of good beats bad to guide their tales. Stories of blood sucking, human possessions and other tales have been passed down generations and vary between cultures. Among the creators of the famous protagonists is, Bram Stoker, the creator of Dracula. This fictional character was soon to be famous, and modified for years to come into movie characters or even into cereal commercials. But the original will never be forgotten; a story of a group of friends all with the same mission, to destroy Dracula....   [tags: dracula] 1486 words
(4.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay about Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA) - 1. Introduction Critical discourse analysis (CDA), according to Crystal (2008 p. 123) is “a perspective which studies the relationship between discourse events, and sociopolitical and cultural factors, especially the way discourse is ideologically influenced by and can itself influence power relations in society”. Thus, the primary aim of CDA seems to uncover hidden power relations and ideological processes at work in spoken or written texts. 2. What is CDA. Fairclough (1995, p. 132) has described CDA as aiming to “systematically explore often opaque relationships of causality and determination between (a) discursive practices, events, and texts, and (b) wider social and cultural structures,...   [tags: disorders of discourse]
:: 11 Works Cited
1539 words
(4.4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Critical Discourse Analysis Essay - Critical Discourse Analysis Jan blommaert and Chris Bulcaen makes a brief introduction to the study of Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA). CDA intends to use social-theoretical method in discourse analysis and is primarily linguistically based (Blommaet & Bulcaen, 2000, p.447). It intends to analyze the structural relationships of dominance, discrimination, power and control through a textual study (Blommaet & Bulcaen, 2000, p.448). Based on the assumption that social discourse is constructed and socially conditioned, CDA explores the power dynamics in this process....   [tags: Social Discourse] 2428 words
(6.9 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay Discourse Communities - To be a part of a discourse community, one must be credible, possess factual knowledge and draw on the values of its members to be accepted into the community. At the same time, a person must learn typical ways people in that community communicate and argue. They share a certain genre—type of writing. Members of discourse communities provide information and feedback that are imperative in order for that discourse community to grow. In the following paper, I will discuss three discourse communities and a genre that they typically use: people who read Nutritional Facts religiously, college students, and industrial organizational psychologists....   [tags: discourse community]
:: 5 Works Cited
1270 words
(3.6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Lilith in Dracula, Carmilla, Christabel, Geraldine and The Hunger Essay - The Lilith in Dracula, Carmilla, Christabel, Geraldine and The Hunger For centuries Lilith, the Queen of the Night, has been blamed when a child or man dies without certain cause or when a woman refuses to be submissive to her husband.  While the Legend of Lilith is not widely known today, it is not difficult to find information about the demoness. However, there are slight variations found from story to story.  Here we will focus on the myth as found in Hebrew mythology, and we will particularly emphasize the similarities seen between Lilith and various vampires seen in literature today.  The Hebrew figure of Lilith was actually borrowed from Babylonian and Syrian myt...   [tags: Dracula]
:: 5 Works Cited
1430 words
(4.1 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Dracula as the Persecuted Outsider in Bram Stoker's Dracula Essay - Dracula as the Persecuted Outsider in Bram Stoker's Dracula Bram Stoker's Dracula is highly acclaimed and has received many different interpretations which deal with complex symbolisms and metaphors. These interpretations often require a great deal of knowledge in psychology, political science, anthropology, and other non-literary disciplines. These interpretations may be valid, as they are related to the disciplines on which their arguments are based, but the true power of the novel is due to a very simple theme that lies beneath the other, more convoluted interpretations....   [tags: Dracula Essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
1692 words
(4.8 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
An Author's Credibility In The Academic Discourse Community Essay - An Author's Credibility In The Academic Discourse Community The academic discourse community has certain expectations about an argument which make the work convincing and credible to members of the community. Before the work is even considered however, the community has expectations of the author. The author must fulfill these expectations in order to be considered credible or convincing. Some general criteria for an author in the academic discourse community include having a voice in the work, credentials and experience that make him or her qualified to write on the subject, a sense of professionalism about them shown in the tone and diction of the work, and a balanced view of all sides of...   [tags: Academic Discourse]
:: 2 Works Cited
2137 words
(6.1 pages)
Term Papers [preview]