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Description of the Impacts of Medical Stigma and Its Effects Essay

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Stigma can be defined as a phenomenon that significantly discredits an individual in the eyes of other people as being different and aberrant. The consequences of stigma can significantly affect the way in which individuals perceive themselves; however, the individual's approach of stigmatization accounts for significant differences in the impact of the illness on the self. Furthermore, stigmatization is a process, and it should therefore be defined as the process of dis-evaluation. It is almost always rooted in the system of negative attitudes that normally exist in communities and cultures, and takes place in the context of connecting people with stigmatized behaviors, illnesses, and disabilities. In addition to this, Erving Goffman defines stigma as a label that distinguishes a person, or group of people from others in discrediting way. In most of the cases, stigma actually refers to people who have obvious physical defects, illnesses, or disabilities, and it is affixed by others who notice those defects.
Stigma is a devastating feeling at the individual level because it leads to feelings of shame, guilt, and isolation. Such negative attitudes is caused by omissions or actions of others which is causing even deeper suffering and enhance of the stigmatized group advocating the fact that they are denying certain services such as the right to healthcare or education. Such actions constitute discrimination and leads toward human rights abuses. Discrimination occurs when a particular person because of the actual or perceived membership of a particular group puts in an unequal and disadvantaged position compared to others. Because the stigma is almost always accompanied by discrimination, people with HIV/AIDS are disabled in the re...


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...and how labeling others because of their disabilities is discriminating, disrespectful, and absurd. The anti-stigma and anti-discrimination project should be organized in seeks to eliminate the barriers to achieving full inclusion in society and increase access to health resources to support individuals and families. All of us can make a big difference by making a commitment to end stigma and discrimination. If we all refuse to create and tolerate stigma, and if we commit to changing our language and attitude about people living with illness, we can help them overcome their fears of being judged by the society they live in, and instead be their support in seeking for medical help instead of rejecting it. Using words like "crazy" or "insane" to describe someone living with illness is hurtful and we shall commit to removing prejudices and wipe stigma off of the earth.


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