Essay Color Key

Free Essays
Unrated Essays
Better Essays
Stronger Essays
Powerful Essays
Term Papers
Research Papers





Decision-Making Model Paper

Rate This Paper:

Length: 1046 words (3 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Red (FREE)      
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Decision-Making Model Paper

Life is full of decisions. Some decisions are trivial. Should I choose paper or plastic at the grocery store? Which of the 31 flavors of ice cream should I pick? Other decisions are vital. Should I get married to her or should I take this new job? Your decisions may affect many people or only yourself. In this paper I will present a decision-making model. I will describe a decision that I made at work using this model and how critical thinking impacted that decision.

Decision making, as taken from the Wikipedia (2006) encyclopedia, is defined as "the cognitive process leading to the selection of a course of action among alternatives. Every decision making process produces a final choice called a decision. It can be an action or an opinion. It begins when we need to do something but we do not know what. Therefore, decision-making is a reasoning process which can be rational or irrational, and can be based on explicit assumptions or tacit assumptions." (para.1). Decisions made by using a decision-making model typically result in better decisions. Decisions resulting from the model tend to be more consistent since the same steps are followed each time. Increased thoroughness of decision options considered is another benefit in using a decision-making model, as numerous factors are taken into account.

The following is a decision-making model that I have used to arrive at a decision.

FRAMING
• Clarify purpose and boundaries of the decision
• Gather information
o Identify who is affected by the decision
o Identify who will make the decision (individual or group)
o Identify what knowledge or expertise is needed to make the decision
o Identify what information or resources currently exist to help with the decision making process
• Define by when the decision needs to be made
• Communicate to affected parties who is making the decision and the rationale for it

DECIDING
• Define how the decision will be made (e.g. consensus, voting, etc.)
• Use appropriate tools that support data gathering (e.g. affinity diagram, brainstorming, fishbone, flowchart, force field, how-how, interrelationship digraph)
• Make the decision through the integration of ideas and data, and negotiation and prioritization of ideas
• Identify who (individual or group) will implement the decision

COMMUNICATING
• Summarize the rationale for the decision
• Communicate the decision, why it was made and the rationale for it

IMPLEMENTING
• Define the steps in implementing the decision including the timeframe for completion
• Define the method for reporting when something is completed and who receives the report

EVALUATING
• Identify the process for assessing impact of decision

Our textbook defines critical thinking as, "The general term given to a wide range of cognitive skills and intellectual dispositions needed to effectively identify, analyze, and evaluate arguments and truth claims, to discover and overcome personal prejudices and biases, to formulate and present convincing reasons in support of conclusions, and to make reasonable, intelligent decisions about what to believe and what to do" (Bassham et al., 2002, p.569). Simply put, critical thinking is being able to look at information critically. It means asking questions about the information presented and then analyzing the answers. It means using the answers to create new ideas, solve problems, and make decisions. Critical thinking is imperative to making sound decisions using a decision-making model.

Last year my company swapped the departments reporting to several managers. I was one of the managers that assumed responsibility for a new staff. After getting acquainted with my department, I had to decide if the team was optimally organized. If I concluded that it was not organized to be most efficient and productive, I had to decide how to rearrange it. I used the decision-making model to determine what, if any, organizational changes I'd have to make.

As part of the framing process of the model, I knew that I alone had to make the decision and it would potentially impact the whole group. However, I wanted get the input from the group since they were more knowledge regarding strengths of each member and they were familiar with the team dynamics. I did not want to make, or at least announce, any changes too quickly to let the shock of having a new boss settle down.

In the deciding phase I took each individual out one-on-one for coffee. I had a list of questions that I had sent to them in advance that I would cover in our coffee break. I stated that my intention was to get to know them and I encouraged them to bring questions for me. I asked questions regarding their perceived role in the group, their career plans, and I asked them what they would change about the group if they were manager for the day. I was able to gather a lot of information through this process. I learned that the previous manager had the staff organized fairly well, with a few exceptions. I decided to only make two minor changes. I decided to shift two individuals to different teams within the group.

As part of the communication phase of the process I conferred my proposed changes with the previous manager of the team. She validated my decision. I shared the rationale behind my organization changes with my boss.

I implemented the change when taking on a new project for the team. I told the impacted individuals that I need their specialized skill sets on their new teams. They seemed to take the news of their moves well and they continue to be content on their new teams. I continue to have periodic one-on-one meetings with my staff. During those meetings I assess the impact of my decision.

Consciously or unconsciously, decisions are made daily at work and at home. These decisions can be made by individuals, work groups, or even families. The more important a decision is the more it necessitates thorough consideration and critical thinking. A decision-making model is a good process to produce optimum decisions.

References

Decision-Making Model. (2002). The Learning Organization, UM Libraries. Retrieved September 12, 2006, from http://www.lib.umd.edu

Wikipedia. (2006). Decision making. Retrieved September 13, 2006, from http://en.wikipedia.org

Bassham, G., Nardone, H., Wallace, J., & Irwin, W. (2002). Critical Thinking − A Student's Introduction. New York: The McGraw−Hill Companies

How to Cite this Page

MLA Citation:
"Decision-Making Model Paper." 123HelpMe.com. 23 Aug 2014
    <http://www.123HelpMe.com/view.asp?id=164527>.








Important Note: If you'd like to save a copy of the paper on your computer, you can COPY and PASTE it into your word processor. Please, follow these steps to do that in Windows:

1. Select the text of the paper with the mouse and press Ctrl+C.
2. Open your word processor and press Ctrl+V.

Company's Liability

123HelpMe.com (the "Web Site") is produced by the "Company". The contents of this Web Site, such as text, graphics, images, audio, video and all other material ("Material"), are protected by copyright under both United States and foreign laws. The Company makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness, or timeliness of the Material or about the results to be obtained from using the Material. You expressly agree that any use of the Material is entirely at your own risk. Most of the Material on the Web Site is provided and maintained by third parties. This third party Material may not be screened by the Company prior to its inclusion on the Web Site. You expressly agree that the Company is not liable or responsible for any defamatory, offensive, or illegal conduct of other subscribers or third parties.

The Materials are provided on an as-is basis without warranty express or implied. The Company and its suppliers and affiliates disclaim all warranties, including the warranty of non-infringement of proprietary or third party rights, and the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose. The Company and its suppliers make no warranties as to the accuracy, reliability, completeness, or timeliness of the material, services, text, graphics and links.

For a complete statement of the Terms of Service, please see our website. By obtaining these materials you agree to abide by the terms herein, by our Terms of Service as posted on the website and any and all alterations, revisions and amendments thereto.



Return to 123HelpMe.com

Copyright © 2000-2013 123HelpMe.com. All rights reserved. Terms of Service