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Critical Analysis of John Edwin May´s Speech

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I attended John Edwin May’s speech about wrestling. I was excited to attend this speech, because growing up I idolized many of the wrestlers on television. I was expecting to learn some new and interesting facts. Sadly there was nothing spectacular about this speech, at least nothing I did not already know. Although John May’s speech was good, there was room for improvement in many areas.
To improve the speech, John could have made sure his attention grabber was at the beginning of his speech. He introduced himself and began to speak his topic. Although, he did finally use one, about ten minutes into his speech, it was not as effective. If he started his speech with this brilliant idea and setup, this would have helped him deliver his speech a little easier. However, the misplacement of his attention grabber did not ruin his speech but would have truly helped. In the handbook, it goes over attention-getter. An attention-getter should be short, sweet, and make an attempt to efficiently capture their audience’s attention (179).
One of the high points was the speaker used going to the theatres and playing video games as a way to make wrestling relevant to his audience. Although video games and movies are fake, people are willing to spend time and money on them. Whereas, people refuse to spend time and money for wrestling, because they say it is fake. Although his point of view carries merit, people also seem to grow out of wrestling when they discover that their childhood hero is a phony. His topic was not an ill choice, because people decided to go to this speech, but he could have made it more relevant to the masses (63-72). He did great with analyzing his audience. Once he knew what jokes and stories the audience liked, he cont...


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...e material from the speech itself. Still in the conclusion, he did not revisit any previous points. A conclusion should tie everything together for the listeners and help the audience remember the main points to a speech. An audience typically remembers the last thing they hear, so the speaker needs to make that memorable as they can.
Although he lacked in some areas, Mr. May’s speech keep the audience entertained. I especially enjoyed the photos, and being able to talk to a wrestler after the speech was finished. I spoke to Bradley Kirkland a local wrestler and according to him, “Wrestling isn’t fake, because the speaker still take a risk of being injured.” Throughout Mr. May's speech he continuously restated that, "Wrestling is not fake."



Works Cited

Sprague, Jo, and Douglas Stuart. The Speaker's Compact Handbook. 3rd ed. Boston: Eckman/Wadsworth, 2011. Print.


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