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Constitutional Framers Essay

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The Confederation congress was plagued with problems as the former colonies struggled to form a national identity. The lack of permanent physical location and united national government led to problems of inaction, following the Revolutionary war. “Congress’s lack of power and frequent inability to act (often due to a lack of quorum or the need for a supermajority for certain decisions) demanded reform” (Wirls 58). The founding fathers agreed on the need for a stronger national government however two opposing groups argued about the nature of its composition. Federalists argued for a strong national government, with a few representatives, removed the day to day local political affairs. They desired a group of political elite leaders, free to make decisions based on national interests. In order to promote an independent nature within the senate, Federalists promoted long terms, some advocating lifetime appointments. The anti-Federalists rejected the idea of permanent elite and instead promoted a large number of representatives with small groups of political constituents. Rather than the crème de la crème of society, anti-Federalists promoted a kaleidoscope vision; representatives would personally reflect the interests of their constituents. During the final constitutional plan for the U.S. Senate a compromise was reached between the two groups; the anti-Federalist views were incorporated in the equal apportionment and appointment by the states, Federalists promoted independence in the senate by instituting staggered six year terms.
The compromise between the Federalist and anti-Federalist was reached through a series of decisions, in part helped by the fact that those against strengthening the Federal governme...


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...the senate, the convention was able to move forward in forming a national government with responsibilities and rights separate from those of the states. The Federalists were able to preserve the independence of the senate through six year terms and more stringent eligibility requirements than those for the House of Representatives. The eventual formation of a separate national capital ensured the both physically as well as psychologically desired independence of the senate and congress desired by the Federalists. The members of both sides present shared a mutual understanding of the need for a senate in a stronger national system. The decisions which lead to the compromise resulted in the creation of a senate through the Constitution which included both Federalist and anti-Federalist views as well as creating unintended consequences neither side anticipated.



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