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Chaucer's Society in Canterbury Tales Essay

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Chaucer's society represents every social class. In doing so, it shows what it takes to actually make a society function. The different people carry different stories to share. These stories carry lessons learned in hopes of sharing them with others so that they may not end up in the same predicaments. After all, that is the main point of sharing stories, isn't it?
In the Nun and Priest's tale, a story of never trusting a flatterer is told. The Pardoner tries to sell indulgences to the pilgrims after he told them he cheats them. Love Conquers all is a main staple of the Prioress. He archetypes this as a quest on which the pilgrims set out upon a quest to their holy site to gain spiritual benefits. Another part of the archetype would be him beginning with the awakening of spring and ending with the images of death and despair.
Throughout the 24 tales, Romance is overdone and the range of attitudes towards life and literature is expressed. The main point of the tales are to share morals. You will now read a few summaries of some of the tales presented in Chaucer's works.
The judge in the Physician's tale lusts after Virginius' daughter. When he finds that she will not give into temptation, he sends someone in to give a fake claim against Virginius that he is only claiming she is his daughter and orders her to be taken away from him immediately. In order to save his daughter from being violated and killed, he explains to her that it would be morally correct for him to kill her while she is still pure so that she can at least save her dignity. In the end, Virginius took the head from his daughter to the judge who upon seeing this, attempted to flee to hang himself. Yet he could not escape the crowd of people who had learned...


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...ething which is supposed to make them rich and full of life, and end up dead from events that have to do with the gold. This tale ends in a short sermon, asking God to forgive the mistakes of good men, and warning them about the sin of greed, before inviting the congregation to offer their wool in return for pardons.
The Canterbury Tales is a great contemplation of stories, that display humorous and ironic examples of medieval life, which imitate moral and ethical problems in history and even those presented today. Chaucer owed a great deal to the authors who produced these works before his time. Chaucer tweaked their materials, gave them new meanings and revealed unscathed truths, thus providing fresh ideas to his readers. Chaucer's main goal for these tales was to create settings in which people can relate, to portray lessons and the irony of human existence.


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