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Essay on Catherine Sedgwick's A New England Tale

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Catherine Sedgwick’s A New England Tale is the story of Jane a young woman who is cast into a family where she is looked down upon, but through her trial and tribulations remains strong in her faith in God. Jonathan Edwards’ sermon Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God focuses on those who lose faith and overlook the power of God’s hand, and by doing so will be sent to hell to repent their sins. Throughout the novel by Sedgwick and the sermon by Edwards it is the importance of moving forwards in life while staying faithful and true to God without sin remains the focus of the pieces.
Edwards’ focus is on those in his congregation that have and are sinning. Those that are damned to hell, but believe that they live a life that will let them fool God and get them into hell. Edwards believes that only a worshiper will be able to get into the good graces of God by remaining a religious person. He state
“How dreadful is the state of those that are daily and hourly in danger of this great wrath and infinite misery! But this is the dismal case of every soul in this congregation that has not been born again, however moral and strict sober and religious they may otherwise be.” (435)
Edwards believes that in order for his followers to be saved they must not only believe but also live a life dedicated to the word of God and to repent all that they have done to move forward and remain in God’s good graces. In Sedgwick’s Novel we listen to the advice Marry gives to Jane when she state
“But my child do not be down-hearted there has One ‘taken you up who will not leave you, nor forsake you.’ The fires may be about you but they will not kindle on you.’ Make the bible your counsellor; you will always find some good word there, that will be a...


... middle of paper ...


...o save herself from the wicked consumption that may befall her from her association with Edward.
In both A New England Tale by Catherine Sedgwick and Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God by Jonathan Edwards, it is life’s expedition, remaining righteous, virtuous and dedicated to God, which will save your soul from the destruction around you. Edwards focuses on the afterlife, he believes that you should live your life in such a way so that you will not suffer in death. Where Sedgwick tends to focus on life; although there are mentions of death, Sedgwick focuses on how living a true and moral life will give you the strength you need to live in and get through the tribulations of everyday. Either life or death, it is important to both Sedgwick and Edwards that one lives a life free of sin and true to God’s will to escape the consumption of their soul into evil.



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