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Essay on Biblical Allusions in Melville's Moby Dick

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In The Town-Ho’s Story, Melville uses many different types of figurative devices to describe the relationship between Steelkilt and Radney. Radney is known and described as the inferior, yet higher ranked, mate, while Steelkilt is described as the more respectable, but lower ranked mate. Melville faintly, yet noticeably relates Moby Dick as a God and Steelkilt as Jesus. Such clever biblical allusions accurately describe Moby Dick and Steelkilt and although Melville does not give any biblical significance to Radney, the readers can still clearly visualize Radney’s character. The Town-Ho’s Story has symbolic significance that both foreshadows and describes Radney, Steelkilt, Moby Dick, and the fate of the Pequod.
Melville uses many figurative devices to explain and describe Steelkilt and Radney’s relationship. Melville uses similes such as, “a head like a roman”, or “was ugly as a mule” to describe the two characters. Steelkilt was described as a “tall and noble animal with a head like a roman” and Radney was described to be “as ugly as a mule.” This shows the irony in their s...


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