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The Arkansas Medical Sciences Program: A Great Fit For Me Essay

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While many students claim to be engrossed in the medical field, one being myself, ultimately, only a few students take action towards their interest at a young age and go ahead on to pursue the field. Therefore, students who are sincere about their interest have a tendency to portray interest in minor research experiments, being in a medical field regardless of any materialistic reward, and being able to experience the true work of someone of the medical field.
Although I am now at fifteen years of age, my interest in the medical field rose at a very young age. While most young children were afraid of visits to the doctor, I was rather fascinated by how much one person could do. At that age, I remember reenacting surgery on my stuffed animals by cutting slits into them, and then mending them with Band-Aids, and eventually by allowing my mother to sew them together again. Shortly after these events, my elementary school made it mandatory that every student from the third grade onwards conduct an experiment or project to be submitted in the school science fair. Even though I was only in the third grade, the projects I chose were always classified in microbiology or medicine and health. After finally reaching the sixth grade, I was eligible to attend the regional science fair. Even then, while doing a project on the effects of yeast, I managed to win second place. Year after year, my projects continued to advance, and in eighth grade, my project reached a higher level when I was set to prove whether hand sanitizers actually killed 99.9% bacteria as they claimed to. This project received third place at the regional science fair. In my first year of high school, I was finally able to compete among the senior division, and I conducted...


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...am also allows familiarity with common equipment and treatments, which is very necessary to students planning on going into the medical field. Exposure to different areas of medicine is very beneficial, as medical school does not initially emphasize on simply one specialization. I too would be a great asset to the program, as I am social, which is necessary to interact with patients, and I am responsible as well, which makes me eligible to handle expensive equipment that the hospital may own. Also, I do not get frightened at the sight of blood, which can potentially serve to be dangerous. The program also teaches certification in basic first aid skills, which are necessary regardless of what field a student may want to pursue. This program would be a great experience over the summer, and would also give me a chance to experience the life of medical field personnel.


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