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Essay about The Amish Culture and Its History

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A look into the Amish culture begins during the time of the Reformation in 16th century Europe. It all began when several groups of the Catholic Church broke off because of their different religious beliefs, convictions, and values. From this split, the Mennonite’s, also known as Anabaptists, were formed. Contrary to Catholicism, the Anabaptists believed that followers should only be baptized if they choose to continue following the Christian faith into adulthood. In 1623, the founder of the Mennonite’s, Menno Simmons, authored the Mennonite Dordrecht Confession of a Faith which outlined the principles of the Mennonite faith. A man by the name of Jacob Amman grew tired and impatient of the lack of support of the Mennonite Dordrecht Confession of a Faith, and decided to branch off and create a new group known as the Amish. The Amish and Mennonites were severely punished and even executed in Europe and therefore relocated to the United States, primarily Pennsylvania. According to Brewer, “Many of the Amish today consider themselves cousins of the Mennonites (Brewer & Bonalumi, 1995). There are five main orders (and many subgroups of each): old order, new order, Schwartzentruber, Andy Weaver and Beachy. Each group follows the guidelines established in the Mennonite Dordrecht Confession of a Faith, however the Ordnung- a set of rules for everyday living, is interpreted and established differently by each order. (Culture Vision).
Rumspringa is a period in an Amish person’s youth in which they are allowed to “run around,” usually in their late teens to early twenties to test their faith. It is not supported by all orders of the Amish, but many participate in it as a trial of the youth’s beliefs. During this time, they are...


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... and also time to practice their spiritual beliefs (pray and read scripture), so that they may feel more comfortable with their health care experience overall.
The Amish are unique in that their religion is a governing body. Their religion dictates every aspect, government, social gatherings, gender interaction, and health care. It is important that a health care provider contribute to the Amish experience in the hospital or clinic. Medical care is only as effective as the patient adhering to the prescribed action. Natural and alternative approaches to medical care should be considered before prescribing modern medicines. Education either by research as an attending nurse or asking questions from the patient or family should be done to ensure that the care provided allows the patient to control the care receives in accordance with how their religion dictates.



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